Mema Interretialia

Internet Memes in Latin

1,064 notes

interretialia:

ex-professo:

interretialia:

interretialia:

I made these.  They are based on the posters that fandom-mused-fandom-games made.  The SPQR image is from here.

Sane!

Scribo latinam nunc.  Latina est magnam.

Optima quidem!

Papae, how many notes did this get just today?

Filed under Latin Latin fandom Reblog Interretialia I've been waiting for this to be reblogged So I could reblog it Not sure whether to use magnam or bonam Or is there a better word for cool? Anyway Who says Latin is a dead language When there are over a thousand notes on this post? Does the English fandom have that many notes? I don't think so! tagamemnon latin fandom latin latin language latin translation lingua latina

30 notes

hanadoodles asked: Ok so ablative absolutes are constructions made of a noun, and a present or past particple, both in the ablative case. e.g. "His verbis dictis, nuntius discessit", or "nuntio loquens, omnes tacebant" (with this words said, the messenger departed.) (with the messenger speaking, everyone was silent) It's usually translated as "with this happening". Another ablative noun can take the place of the participle, e.g. Lana rege, vincemus (With Lana as king, we shall conquer.)

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

triumvirate2014:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

o i c now ‘A’

seems p easy to understand

and yes we shall conquer

You like Ablative Absolutes? Good, because Caesar begins very many of his “chapters” with them.

WE DON’T TALK ABOUT CAESAR. ~O

i have a feeling i’m gonna regret thi post 2-3 years from now or something b/c i’m still in my viabu phase

No regrets.

Also: Lana rege, vincemus—Since Lana is our king, we’ll kick ass.

Filed under viabu lana tagamemnon latin fandom latin latin language latin translation lingua latina ablative absolute

30 notes

hanadoodles asked: Ok so ablative absolutes are constructions made of a noun, and a present or past particple, both in the ablative case. e.g. "His verbis dictis, nuntius discessit", or "nuntio loquens, omnes tacebant" (with this words said, the messenger departed.) (with the messenger speaking, everyone was silent) It's usually translated as "with this happening". Another ablative noun can take the place of the participle, e.g. Lana rege, vincemus (With Lana as king, we shall conquer.)

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

o i c now ‘A’

seems p easy to understand

and yes we shall conquer

You like Ablative Absolutes? Good, because Caesar begins very many of his “chapters” with them.

Filed under lana asks and chizz ask me things yes tagamemnon latin fandom latin latin language latin translation lingua latina

1,064 notes

ex-professo:

interretialia:

interretialia:

I made these.  They are based on the posters that fandom-mused-fandom-games made.  The SPQR image is from here.

Sane!

Scribo latinam nunc.  Latina est magnam.

Optima quidem!

Filed under Latin Latin fandom Reblog Interretialia I've been waiting for this to be reblogged So I could reblog it Not sure whether to use magnam or bonam Or is there a better word for cool? Anyway Who says Latin is a dead language When there are over a thousand notes on this post? Does the English fandom have that many notes? I don't think so! tagamemnon latin fandom latin latin language latin translation lingua latina

48 notes

Remula?!

melp0mene:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

so if remus won against romulus

would the city be 

reme

Fortasse Remula (tamquam Ianiculum ex “Ianus”)!

It’s already named ‘Reme’ or ‘Рим’ in Russian, although I’m not quite sure why…

Hahahae, illud iocosum est!

According to the story, Romulus gave the city the name Roma. But modern scholars think that it is the other way around: Romulus came from Roma—a diminutive of Roma.

The second etymology is probably closer to the truth, and yet I do not think the form Romulus is a diminutive. Instead, I think this diminutive-looking suffix -ulus is a substantive adjective suffix that means “deity who presides over [something]” as in:

  • Arculus (from arca), the deity who presides over chests;
  • Forculus (from foris), the deity who presides over the doors;
  • Sterculus (from stercus), the deity who presides over manuring;
  • Partula (from partus), the goddess who presides over birth.

In that case, Romulus (from Roma) = the deity who presides over Rome.

The suffix seems to go the other way in the sense that it means “thing named after a deity,” as in Ianiculum (hill named after Janus) from Ianus.

Hence my suggestion Remula.

Filed under latin linguistics stuff etymology diminutive latin diminutive latin diminutives tagamemnon latin fandom latin language latin translation lingua latina

23 notes

The funny thing here is that all four are possible.
Octopuses: English plural ending in -es;
Octopi: declined like Oedipus (Οἰδίπους) and polypus (πολύπους);
Octopodi: -pod- with -us added, like apodus (ἄποδος = ἄπους);
Octopodes: Greek and Latin masculine/feminine plural.

And then there is the neuter plural form Octopoda!

The funny thing here is that all four are possible.

And then there is the neuter plural form Octopoda!

(Source: latin-student-problems)

Filed under latin plural confusion octopus octopi is right octopi is wrong octopodi octopodes plural of octopus pluralization of octopus paradigm paradigms latin paradigm latin paradigms declension declensions latin declension latin declensions latin language latin translation lingua latina

46 notes

Ita Non Puto!

mediocre-latinist:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

god-senpai-of-mankind:

rift-in-the-warp:

Have you ever noticed how Ancient Greek names all sound the same? I mean you have Pericles, Hercules, Themisticles, Achilles, Testicles, Socrates, etc.

Technically, Hercules was the Roman pronunciation. The Greek was Heracles.

was testicles a real name OMG

I don’t think so!

Testiculi is LAAAAAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTIIIIIIIIN, though!

LAAAAAAATIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIN!!!

you’ve got to admit it was a brilliant pun though

Em, sane, esse iocosum illud negare est vere difficile.

Filed under tagamemnon latin fandom latin latin language latin translation lingua latina puns