Mema Interretialia

Internet Memes in Latin / Διαδικτυακα Μιμιδια Ρωμαιστι

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Sushi Latin

not-a-linguist-yet:

There were thousands of sushi bars in Rome, but most of them were lost to the shifting sands of time. Perhaps this list of phrases will restore the former glory of these ancient establishments.

No mackerel, no eel, and no slab of cold egg curd
“Mihi nullus scomber, nulla anguilla, nullum frustum ovorum frictorum frigidorum.”

More tuna, please, and another California roll.
“Da mihi plus de thunno, sodes, at alterum volumen Califonicum.”

You guys make great cars!
“Vos vehicula praestantia fabricamini.”

Thank you very much
“Vobis plurimas gratias ago”

The translations are by Henry Beard. Hopefully this helps the next person to find themselves in a sushi bar in the Vatican!

This reminds me of my Latin translation of sushi: oryza acetosa. ☺

Filed under Latin latin language sushi latin latin translation lingua latina tagamemnon latin fandom

1 note

Formatio Verborum Latinorum / Formation of Latin Words

τὸ παράδειγμα -ατος / paradigma -atis n. “pattern, model; paradigm”
  [παραδείκνυμι “exhibit side by side” + -μα suffix denoting result of action]
  [παραδεικνυ- + -ματ-] stems
  [παραδεικ- + -ματ-] shorter stem and stem
  [παραδεικματ-] new stem
  [παραδειγματ-] κ before μ becomes γ through assimilation
  [παράδειγμα] nominative singular
  [paradigma] παράδειγμα Latinized

Filed under Formation of Latin Words Word Formation Latin Word Formation latin latin language latin translation lingua latina

90 notes

o-eheu:

aernyk:

Latin on the Internet

o-eheu:

interretialia:

not-a-linguist-yet:

According to a professor at the University of Warsaw, Latin can be adapted to be more hip. I will never type “lol” again.

That is kind of the point of Mema Interretialia! ☺

# (hashtag)
“nota notandi”

I like cancellulus,…

In place of BRB, one could write RVNM, a shortened form of reveniam.

Or MR… mox reveniam (I will return soon)

-Beniaminus

Fortasse: MRM (m[ox ]r[evenia]m).

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0 notes

Nova Iuncta Verba Latina / New Latin Compounds

φιλιοφάγος -ον / philiophagus -a -um “feeding on love”
  [φιλία “love, friendly love” + -φάγος “feeding on”]
  [φιλια- + -φαγο-] stems
  [φιλιο- + -φαγο-] α becomes Connecting Vowel ο
  [φιλιοφαγο-] new stem
  [φιλιοφάγος] nominative singular
  [philiophagus] φιλιοφάγος Latinized

image

(Fons Imaginis.)

Filed under New Latin Compounds Word Formation Latin Word Formation latin latin language latin translation lingua latina My Little Pony mlp Friendship Is Magic My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic pony brony bronies Changelings

90 notes

Latin on the Internet

aernyk:

o-eheu:

interretialia:

not-a-linguist-yet:

According to a professor at the University of Warsaw, Latin can be adapted to be more hip. I will never type “lol” again.

That is kind of the point of Mema Interretialia! ☺

# (hashtag)
“nota notandi”

I like cancellulus,…

Perhaps CCHN would be better for a shortening of cachinno, to avoid any confusion with caco?

There should not be any confusion because there are plenty of Latin words that begin with cac, and CAC has not been used as an abbreviation for cacare. (The cacare idea is pretty CAC-worthy/lulzworthy to me, frankly.) One is more likely to take CAC as a variant of an abbreviation of circa—but still not too likely to be used for something entirely different.

Filed under latin latin language latin translation lingua latina tagamemnon latin fandom

0 notes

Formatio Verborum Latinorum / Formation of Latin Words

τὸ πρόγραμμα -ατος / programma -atis n. “proclamation, edict; program”
  [προγράφω “write publicly” + -μα suffix denoting result of action]
  [προγραφ- + -ματ-] stems
  [προγραφματ-] new stem
  [προγραμματ-] φ before μ becomes μ through assimilation
  [πρόγραμμα] nominative singular
  [programma] πρόγραμμα Latinized

Filed under Formation of Latin Words Word Formation Latin Word Formation latin latin language latin translation lingua latina

21 notes

surfingwavefunctions:

Today’s hobby: being confused by Latin. Can someone explain this to me?

Absolutely!
First of all, you should keep in mind what Cinefactus says in the opening post in this thread:
http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/do-not-post-machine-translations.5579/

Do not use machine translators for Latin.THEY ARE INVARIABLY WRONG

And it bears repeating:

THEY. ARE. INVARIABLY. WRONG.

The Latin translations in the images you posted are perfect demonstrations of what Cinefactus says because all of them are wrong.
Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus: Tempus means “time” and dominus means “lord,” but while you can put together two nouns like that in English to make one of them function as an adjective, you cannot just pile on non-appositive nouns in the same case like that in Latin to do the same thing. The first word and the second word in both Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus are likely to be taken as appositives, as if implying that the time is the lord. That is not what is meant.
Tempus Domine: Domine here is vocative singular, and the vocative is the case of direct address: “Lord!” or “Oh lord!” Tempus can be vocative singular as well (or nominative singular or accusative singular). Either way, this has the apposition-related problem that the Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus phrases have.
tempore domini: This is possible in Latin, but depending on how you want to take the forms, it can mean various things like “at the time of the lord” (ablative singular, genitive singular) or “at the time, the lords” (ablative singular, nominative plural). But “Time Lord” is not what it means.
What should you use? Here is a simple translation:

Dominus Temporis

Dominus is nominative singular. Temporis is genitive singular. “Lord of Time” is one way to re-English-ify it, but the genitive case turns a noun or pronoun into a sort of indeclinable adjective. A word in the genitive case is sometimes interchangeable with an adjective. In this case, because of that case (the genitive), the Temporis represents the adjectival noun Time in Time Lord.
Tardis Data Core has this:

Also known as: Time Lord or in Latin, Dominus temporis

There you go.

surfingwavefunctions:

Today’s hobby: being confused by Latin. Can someone explain this to me?

Absolutely!

First of all, you should keep in mind what Cinefactus says in the opening post in this thread:

http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/do-not-post-machine-translations.5579/

Do not use machine translators for Latin.
THEY ARE INVARIABLY WRONG

And it bears repeating:

THEY. ARE. INVARIABLY. WRONG.

The Latin translations in the images you posted are perfect demonstrations of what Cinefactus says because all of them are wrong.

  • Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus: Tempus means “time” and dominus means “lord,” but while you can put together two nouns like that in English to make one of them function as an adjective, you cannot just pile on non-appositive nouns in the same case like that in Latin to do the same thing. The first word and the second word in both Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus are likely to be taken as appositives, as if implying that the time is the lord. That is not what is meant.
  • Tempus Domine: Domine here is vocative singular, and the vocative is the case of direct address: “Lord!” or “Oh lord!” Tempus can be vocative singular as well (or nominative singular or accusative singular). Either way, this has the apposition-related problem that the Tempus Dominus and tempus dominus phrases have.
  • tempore domini: This is possible in Latin, but depending on how you want to take the forms, it can mean various things like “at the time of the lord” (ablative singular, genitive singular) or “at the time, the lords” (ablative singular, nominative plural). But “Time Lord” is not what it means.

What should you use? Here is a simple translation:

Dominus Temporis

Dominus is nominative singular. Temporis is genitive singular. “Lord of Time” is one way to re-English-ify it, but the genitive case turns a noun or pronoun into a sort of indeclinable adjective. A word in the genitive case is sometimes interchangeable with an adjective. In this case, because of that case (the genitive), the Temporis represents the adjectival noun Time in Time Lord.

Tardis Data Core has this:

Also known as: Time Lord or in Latin, Dominus temporis

There you go.

Filed under latin translation time lord doctor who time lords i've got the url tempus domine saved tempted to change but i gotta think about it latin language latin lingua latina tagamemnon latin fandom

5 notes

sandy3151 asked: Salve! I couldn't help noticing your translation of 'Let love grow' and felt like commenting. It looks like you're assuming that it's a jussive subjunctive, but I think the meaning in English is ambiguous and it could be a command to an individual: "(you) let the love grow." I also considered that it could be a third person imperative, but those are only in future and very rare. Just reflecting on the grammar for fun. :) I love your blog and always enjoy seeing your quotation translations.

o-eheu:

Of course! Always open to discuss grammar. English-to-Latin is always a little tricky because it’s not always clear.

I do maintain the jussive subjunctive here. Expressing this phrase as an imperative just seems peculiar to me. It’s like saying “Permit the love to grow,” which doesn’t feel right to me in this context. Rather, “May the love grow” seems much better suited to the context.

Thanks for commenting, sandy3151!

-Beniaminus

Yes.

Unless you really are trying to say something like “Permit the love to grow” (and the person’s “the meaning in English is ambiguous” only seems to weaken the notion that specifically that “Permit…” meaning is meant), “let…” or “may…” is sufficient and such wording is the usual way of translating such statements.

A more vexing question is whether that subjunctive is jussive… or optative.

Filed under latin grammar latin latin language lingua latina sandy3151 tagamemnon latin translation latin fandom

7 notes

jackburcham:

http://instagram.com/jackburcham1/
Some calligraphy work which I have featured on the my Instagram. Posting it on all other social networks which i have.
Just been doing some more calligraphy work keeping up with the Status Quo..
#calligraphy #sketching #sketch #letters #letras #lettering #letterfiend #script #scriptlettering #tattooscript #drawing #handwritten #handstyle #typo #typography

Bene.

jackburcham:

http://instagram.com/jackburcham1/

Some calligraphy work which I have featured on the my Instagram. Posting it on all other social networks which i have.

Just been doing some more calligraphy work keeping up with the Status Quo..

#calligraphy #sketching #sketch #letters #letras #lettering #letterfiend #script #scriptlettering #tattooscript #drawing #handwritten #handstyle #typo #typography

Bene.

Filed under calligraphy sketching sketch sketches Letters letras lettering letterfiend letter head script script lettering tattooscript drawing hand drawn free hand handwritten handwriting handstyle Typography typology typo latin latin language latin translation lingua latina tagamemnon latin fandom